Course Modules

Courses

Please find below brief descriptions for the modules offered. More detailed information on each of these courses is available from the Student Administrator: sas.registry@sas.ac.uk.

Core Modules

International Corporate Governance and Transnational Corporations (core course)

The course will address the law of transnational corporations and the principles of corporate governance that influence the management of multi-national enterprises and corporate groups. Key areas include: theoretical underpinnings of corporate law and governance, separate legal personality and limited liability within the corporate group, as well as the public international law governing shareholder rights and investment, European company law and related issues of market abuse and insider dealing.

Lecturer: Professor Kern Alexander, Dr Francesco De Pascalis, Dr Dionysia Katelouzou
Mode of Assessment: 3500 word essay
Hours of Teaching: 20 hours

International Capital Markets Law and Securities Regulation (core course)

This course has been specially designed for students that have completed their undergraduate degree in law, finance, management or economics. The course does not assume that you have previously studied financial regulation. It is designed to contribute to your enhanced understanding of the ways in which governments and public authorities intervene in the operation of financial markets.

The course focuses on the principles of regulation of international financial markets and examines the public regulation of financial markets - that is, the relationship between central government, independent government agencies or indeed international organizations on the one hand, and financial markets or market participants on the other.

Lecturer: Dr Monica Sah, Dr Pierre Schammo, Dr Nicholas Dorn and Dr Andromachi Georgosouli
Mode of Assessment: 3500 word essay
Hours of Teaching: 20 hours

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The courses often offered in this programme include:

Bank Corporate Governance (elective course)

This course examines the principles and regulation of corporate governance that are applicable to banks and financial institutions. The economic theories of the principal-agent model will be examined and the potential conflict between shareholder wealth maximization objectives and regulatory objectives will be assessed. The legal regulation of corporate governance for banks and financial institutions will be examined from the UK perspective along with the proposed new international framework of Basel II. Transaction cost and social cost theories as they relate to financial regulation will be examined. Comparisons will be drawn with US corporate governance and regulatory practice.

Lecturer: Dr Rahul Dhumale and Dr Nikoletta Kleftouri
Mode of Assessment: 3500 word essay
Hours of Teaching: 20 hours

Comparative European Banking and Securities Regulation (elective course)

Main areas: EU Banking Law, EU Monetary Law, European System of Central Banks/European Central Bank/National Central Banks, Institutional Developments of European Financial Regulation, EU Securities Regulation, Financial Services Action Plan & Lamfalussy framework and Market Abuse and Insider Dealing. The course will provide the opportunity to examine the legal, regulatory and institutional aspects of the law governing banking, monetary policy and payment systems, and investments services and securities markets in the European Union. One of the underlying themes will be the continuing interaction between these aspects and the globalisation of financial markets.

Mode of Assessment: 3500 word essay
Hours of Teaching: 20 hours

Extraterritorial US Financial Regulations (elective course)

United States financial regulation and financial sanctions programmes have become increasingly important in today's global financial markets and often impose onerous regulatory requirements for non-US banks and financial service firms. The modules will focus on the extraterritorial legal and regulatory framework of US banking, securities, anti-money laundering and economic sanctions law and their impact on European and other non-US financial service firms and any businesses which conduct transactions with US persons or in the US, or control or manage US property outside the US.

Mode of Assessment: 3500 word essay
Hours of Teaching: 20 hours

Foreign Investment Law and Policy (elective course)

This course will examine the regulation of foreign direct investment (FDI) in the EU, U.S. and selected foreign countries, including the analysis of relevant treaties, codes, guidelines, and other applicable international instruments - both bilateral and multilateral - pertinent to the various investment regulatory regimes.  The course will begin with an introduction to the economics and history of FDI and, more generally, multinational corporations and then focus on three major subject areas:  (1) national regulation of FDI; (2) international protection of FDI; (3) current policy debates on the role of FDI in developing countries.  Each segment will culminate in a fairly complex simulation of relevant practice situations, which will include the regulatory screening of a foreign investment for national security purposes, an international arbitration of a claim that an investment has been expropriated, and an interagency consideration of a controversial policy issue in FDI.

Mode of Assessment: 3500 word essay 
Hours of Teaching: 20 hours

Foundations of Economic Regulation (elective course)

The course aims at providing students with knowledge of welfare economics, the policy and the law of economic regulations, regulatory theories, law as an instrument for economic policy and the process of formulation of regulatory laws for contestable market and non-contestable markets. It will enable students to understand the function and structure of the markets, markets failures and the regulations in the modern market economy, the relationship between private law and regulatory laws, international implications and scope of national regulatory regimes. The course focuses on techniques and methods used in the production of regulatory laws and setting the regulatory standards by using economic theories and legal analyses. Students will enhance their skills as advisors to legislators in the process of formulation of regulatory laws such as competition laws, regulation of public utilities, securities regulation, banking regulations.

Mode of Assessment: 3500 word essay
Hours of Teaching: 20 hours 

International Commercial Arbitration and Alternative Dispute Resolution (elective course)

The course aims at providing students with essential skills and knowledge to manage or avoids disputes and, if necessary, engage in the process of resolution of international commercial and economic disputes through international commercial arbitration or other forms of international dispute resolution. The course will enable students to understand the structure of the international contracts and the role and place of international commercial arbitration in resolution of disputes arising from international economic and commercial relations. It also covers the process of arbitration and the rules governing arbitration procedures, issues of arbitrality of economic law disputes, substantive applicable law and international enforcement of arbitration awards. Through practical exercises, the course focuses on techniques in negotiating and drafting international contracts as well as the methods of resolving possible disputes through mediation and negotiation.

Mode of Assessment: 3500 word essay
Hours of Teaching: 20 hours

International Economic Law and Organisation (elective course)

This course covers the principles and international legal rules that govern cross-border trade in financial and commercial services, and the operations of international economic and financial organisations. After a review of the applicable concepts, principles, sources of customary international economic law and the historical development of international economic organisations in the twentieth century, the modules will focus on the legal and institutional structure of international economic and financial governance with particular attention on the International Monetary/World Bank, the World Trade Organisation and related international standard setting bodies (eg., Basel Committee on Banking Supervision). It will analyse the basic architecture of the international economic and financial system and the different instruments of cross-border cooperation, coordination, and supervision of international finance and the relevance of soft law norms in this field. The focus on the IMF will include questions regarding the implementation of international standards and transparency in monetary and financial policies and the various governance practices of central banks designed to reduce systematic risk.

In addition, the World Trade Organisation and its predecessor body the GATT will be analysed and its important role in governing international trade relations as well as the principles of the international trading system. A brief overview of the objectives of the WTO will be provided and the different agreements, the GATT, the GATS and TRIPS and its important principles. The principal focus will be on the institutional aspects, including the legal structure, decision-making structure, and dispute settlement rules. A few cases illustrative of these principles will be read and discussed in seminar. Moreover, the relevant international agreements covering private law transactions will be examined, including the UN International Convention of the Sale of Goods and related arguments.

Lecturers: Professor Kofi Oteng Kufuor and Dr Andrea Miglionico  
Mode of Assessment: 3500 word essay
Hours of Teaching: 20 hours

The Law of International Trade and Finance (elective course)

This course provides an understanding of the general framework of international trade law and regulation, basic legal concepts of international trade law, and practical skills in negotiating and settling international transactions, and an understanding the legal implications of managerial decision making related to international trade strategy and concepts.

The course also provides an understanding of the private law aspects of international finance. It consists of various aspects of the rapidly changing international banking regulation, trade finance, private international law of international finance, including securities transactions, syndicated loans and legal aspects of international payment. The focus will be on choice of law issues in cross-border transactions, the use of model contracts in international commerce, the provision of finance for international transactions (documentary credits), and regulatory challenges and practitioner strategies, international conventions governing private law issues (eg. the Hague Convention on Indirectly-Held Securities).

Lecturer: Dr Mahmood Bagheri
Mode of Assessment: 3500 word essay
Hours of Teaching: 20 hours

Money Laundering and Financial Regulation (elective course)

The course will provide an understanding of the legal and regulatory principles that apply to companies and businesses in the area of anti-money laundering control and compliance. It addresses issues of civil and criminal liability from a company and business enterprise perspective and the regulatory policy objectives of implementing anti-money laundering rules, as well as many of the conceptual dilemmas in regulatory policy. Special attention will be given to counter-terrorist financial regulation and terrorist financing methods.

Lecturer: Dr Giannis Keramidas
Mode of Assessment: 3500 word essay
Hours of Teaching: 20 hours

UK Banking and Securities Regulation (elective course)

The course will address the law and regulation governing banks and securities firms in the United Kingdom and related issues of corporate governance of financial institutions and securities firms. Key areas include: the public law aspects of banking and securities regulation as set forth under the Financial Services and Markets Act 2000 and the relevant regulations and rules adopted by the Financial Services Authority. The rules governing disclosure of listed companies as set forth by the UK Listing Authority and ongoing reporting requirements required by the FSA will be examined. Related rules of accounting regulation will be addressed along with the problems of corporate fraud, market abuse and other legal issues affecting investor protection. Recent case law involving FSA enforcement actions will be examined and ongoing compliance practices of UK financial firms and individuals with the UK regulatory rulebook will be analysed.

Mode of Assessment: 3500 word essay
Hours of Teaching: 20 hours

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Page last updated: 27th January 2017